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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q

Test Identifier Information

 
Registration CodeDTOX
Method

Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection. Nucleic acid extraction, PCR amplification and detection.

External Price$304.96(Exclusive of GST)
  

Specimen Collection

 
Specimen Collection Protocols

Specimen Collection for Toxoplasma DNA Testing

 

Congenital infection

Amniotic fluid 10 mL. (Collect at delivery if possible).

Fresh placental biopsy in isotonic saline.

Cord blood – 1 mL in EDTA tube.

 

Intrauterine infection

Amniotic fluid; 10 mL

Foetal blood (EDTA tube)

Amniotic fluid is the preferred sample.

 

Acutely infected adult or immunocompromised patient

Blood – 5 mL EDTA tube

CSF – 2 mL CSF

Tissue biopsy - Lymph node, cardiac biopsy, brain biopsy etc.

 

Ocular toxoplasmosis

Vitreous fluid

Patient SpecimenSee specimen collection protocol
Paediatric SpecimenSee specimen collection protocol
Sample Delivery to LabAt 4C (on melting ice or chilly pad)
Aliquot Transport to CHLPlace specimen in PCR bag.
  

CHLabs Laboratory

 
DepartmentMicrobiology-Virology
Contact Details** Unknown email address **
Contact Phone Number03-3640416 / ext. 80416
Test AvailabilityBatched Mon - Fri, 0900 - urgent testing by arrangement
Turnaround Time4 - 75 hours
Interpretation

Application:

Toxoplasma DNA detection may be useful when an acute infection with toxoplasma is considered.

 

It is recommended that toxoplasma serological testing is performed prior to DNA testing to ascertain the patients antibody status. In cases of suspected congenital infection the mother should be tested for the presence of toxoplasma antibodies prior

to bleeding the baby.

 

It is recommended that the laboratory is consulted before collecting specimens for toxoplasma DNA testing.

Additional Information

Toxoplasma gondii

 

Congenital toxoplasmosis:

The infection is the result of Toxoplasma crossing the placental barrier in the case of an acute maternal infection. An accurate diagnostic method for Toxoplasma infection is crucial, because treatment of the mother reduces the incidence of congenital infection during pregnancy.

 

Acquired infection in the immunocompetent patient:

Presents in general as an asymptomatic infection, occasionally cervical lymphadenopathy and/or flu-like symptoms can be observed. The infection takes a benign course and is self-limiting.

 

Acquired infection in the immunocompromised patient:

The infection can be newly acquired or occur as a reactivation of a past infection. CNS involvement is common, especially in AIDS patients where it presents as encephalitis with focal calcified lesions.

 

Ocular toxoplasmosis:

It mainly presents as chorioretinitis, which is characteristically bilateral in congenital disease and unilateral in-patients with acquired infection.

Delphic Number Test Number2742

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