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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q

Test Identifier Information

 
Registration CodeCER
Method

Immunoassay on Siemens BNII nephelometer.

Diagnostic Use / Indications

Ceruloplasmin is both an acute phase protein and a copper transport protein.

Ceruloplasmin levels may be elevated by infection, inflammation or oestrogen effects.

Ceruloplasmin levels may be reduced in Wilson's disease, or in rare acquired copper deficiencies (excessive zinc intake, persistent infantile diarrhoea, severe malabsorption or kwashiorkor). 

Copper is incorporated into the ceruloplasmin structure by metallothionein during synthesis in the liver. The absence of metallothionein (Wilson's Disease) can result in the decrease of serum ceruloplasmin levels, leading to the accumulation of copper in the liver, kidneys, skin, brain (with associated neurological symptoms) and also the cornea of the eye (Kayser-Fleischer Ring).

External Price$38.57(Exclusive of GST)
  

Specimen Collection

 
Patient SpecimenBlood 5-10mL,Plain(Red) or Heparin(Green)
Paediatric SpecimenBlood 0.2 mL, Plain(Red) or Heparin(Green)
  

Instructions for Referral to CHLabs

 
Aliquot Instructions0.5 mL serum (RED) or Heparin plasma (GREEN)
Aliquot Transport to CHLASAP - on ice or ambient
  

CHLabs Laboratory

 
DepartmentBiochemistry - Protein Laboratory
Contact Details Email Email
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Contact Phone Number(03)3640334 | x80334
Test AvailabilityMonday to Friday, 8.00 am - 5.00 pm. Urgent testing by arrangement
Turnaround Time1 -3 days
Reference Interval
AgeConcentration (g/L)*
  
Adult0.15-0.60

* Ceruloplasmin levels are age and sex dependant.

Interpretation

Ceruloplasmin levels are quite variable, so care should be taken in the interpretation of the result. These results should also be interpreted with respect to other acute phase protein responses.

Ceruploplasmin levels are elevated by:

  • Inflammation
  • Infection
  • Oestrogen therapy (e.g. oral contraceptives)
  • Pregnancy

If severely elevated the ceruloplasmin may give serum a distinctive blue-green colour.

Ceruloplasmin levels may be decreased in:

  • Wilson's Disease
  • Neprotic syndrome
  • Protein losing enteropathy
  • Liver disease.
  • Copper deficiency (severe malnutrition, persistant infantile diarrhoea, zinc over-use, kwashiorkor) - These conditions are rare.
  • Menke's disease (rare 1: 50,000 births) 

Note: Patients homozygous for Wilson's disease may not always have extremely low ceruloplasmin levels (<0.15 g/L). In the same manner heterozygous patients may have normal to moderately decreased levels of ceruloplasmin.

Delphic Number Test Number3217

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