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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q

Test Identifier Information

 
Registration CodeSPCR
Method

Leptospira DNA detection. Nucleic acid extraction, PCR amplification and detection.

External Price$143.79(Exclusive of GST)
  

Specimen Collection

 
Specimen Collection Protocols

Specimen requirements for Leptospira PCR©

 

Acute septicaemic phase (within 5 days of onset of symptoms)

 

  • Whole blood (5 mL EDTA, purple top tube)
  • CSF (minimum 0.5 mL) (If meningitis is suspected)
  • Urine 20 mL (preferably EMU)
  • Tissue (please consult Virology) 

Leptospira can only be detected from blood, CSF and tissue up to 7 days after initial clinical onset. For diagnosis beyond this period a urine sample is required.

 

Immune phase (> 7 days after beginning of symptoms)

 

  • Urine 20 mL(preferably EMU)
  • Aqueous humor (please consult Virology) 

Due to the intermittent excretion of Leptospira from urine a negative result does not exclude the diagnosis of Leptospirosis. A repeat urine sample should be submitted if there is high clinical suspicion and the initial urine PCR test is negative.

Patient SpecimenSee specimen collection protocol
Sample Delivery to Lab4C or on melting ice
Aliquot Transport to CHLPlace specimen in PCR bag.
  

CHLabs Laboratory

 
DepartmentMicrobiology-Virology
Contact Details** Unknown email address **
Contact Phone Number03-3640416 / ext. 80416
Test AvailabilityBatched Mon - Fri, 0900 - urgent testing by arrangement
Turnaround Time7 - 75 hrs
Interpretation

Application and Interpretation

 

PCR is important for early diagnosis during the acute phase of illness before an antibody response is mounted. This assay detects all pathogenic Leptospira spp.

Serological testing for Leptospira is useful during the convalescent phase of the disease and for serovar identification. A clotted blood sample (10 mL red top tube) should be submitted for IgM testing (antibody appears 7-10 days after onset of symptoms) and should be followed up with a convalescent sample for microscopic particle agglutination testing.

 

Interpretation

A positive test supports diagnosis.

 

CSF, Blood and Tissue

Leptospira can only be detected from blood, CSF and tissue up to 7 days after initial clinical onset. For diagnosis beyond this period a urine sample is required.

 

Urine

Due to the intermittent excretion of Leptospira from urine a negative result does not exclude the diagnosis of Leptospirosis. A repeat urine sample should be submitted if there is high clinical suspicion and the initial urine PCR test is negative.

Additional Information

Background

Leptospira is a spiral shaped bacteria that causes mild to severe disease in humans. It causes Leptospirosis, which is NZs most commonly occupationally acquired infectious disease and one of the most common zoonosis. Leptospirosis is spread by contact with animal urine or animal by-products. Leptospires penetrate intact human mucous membranes to enter the blood stream. It has an incubation period of 2 - 7 days, followed by a septicaemic phase of 3 - 7 days. The second “immune phase” lasts 4 - 30 days or longer. Severe illness caused by Leptospira is known as Weil’s disease, which may be associated with jaundice, acute renal failure, haemorrhage, conjunctival injection, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis and respiratory distress syndrome.

 

Leptospirosis is a notifiable infectious disease and should be reported to the Medical Officer of Health.

Delphic Number Test Number2047

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